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How do you spell love? B-u-t-t-e-r

How do you spell love? B-u-t-t-e-r

When it comes to cooking and baking, I like to live by the motto, ‘more is always more.’

Forget the recipe- if you really love something (like I love vanilla) a little extra pinch or two isn’t going to ruin your recipe. Now I wouldn’t go completely overboard on anything and everything, but I think a ‘liberal’ amount rather than a perfectly measured amount of that one ingredient you really love (an extra handful of chocolate chips, a dash more nutmeg or cinnamon, a splash more of vanilla…) will only make you love what you’re making that much more!

And let’s be honest, whoever said ‘less is more’ was a fool when it comes to to the good things in life- more is always more… which leads me to a confession. I have another great love in baking/cooking– butter. Blame it on my southern heritage and the south’s collective love of all things delicious and fattening, but I just love the taste of butter. And gladly, I’m not alone in my butter love. My entire family (even the dog- we once caught him eating an entire stick of butter we had left to soften on the counter) loves butter. We’re generally pretty health conscious and don’t go slathering everything in sight with butter, but the holidays are a time to indulge. So naturally, almost everything in our Thanksgiving feast includes- yep, you guessed it- heaping amounts of butter.

Blurring the Lines

Blurring the Lines

Well done, FOX, well done.

From the article, “Fox to Use Hulu Inventory for Advertiser ‘Make-Goods'” in the November 23 issue of AdAge MediaWorks:

‘Fox has secured agreements with about a dozen advertisers to supply them with inventory from online-video site Hulu to make up for ratings shortfalls on its broadcast network, according to the News Corp. network’s top ad-sales executive. The move is the latest signal that marketers are growing more comfortable with the idea that consumers who watch TV via the web are comparable to a more traditional TV audience.’

(Read the entire article here)

Simply put, an impression is an impression and a viewer is a viewer. I couldn’t agree more with FOX’s strategy of all of its available assets to meet an advertiser’s guaranteed delivery– except maybe to make it a part of the initial sell rather than as an option in a make-good situation. Just think for a minute– how do you consume media? How many of us just watch TV? Or just use the Internet? Or just use our phones? Or ‘just use’ one media vehicle for that matter? I’m going to make a wild assumption here (and please correct me if I’m wrong)– not many of us ‘just use’ one thing anymore to consume media. Now it’s more of a question of what we’re not using to consume media. Our ever increasing connectivity to media across an ever increasing number of platforms gives advertisers so many more ways in which to reach us– it almost seems foolish for an advertiser not to have simultaneous campaigns running across multiple platforms. Why not reach your audience in every way they consume media?

What I’ve Learned from ‘Dancing With the Stars…’

… And how I think it’s applicable to advertising.

Love her or hate her, Bristol Palin is a force to be reckoned with on Dancing With the Stars. She’s managed to stay on the show while much better dancers have been sent home, and the tabloids/entertainment tv only seem to be able to talk about her and Jennifer Grey. She’s become the ‘face’ of Dancing With the Stars.

Why? Don’t a lot of people hate her/her association with extreme tea-party politics/her family?

Yes, but for as many people who dislike her/her family’s politics, that many people also love her. She’s a polarizing figure, and that polarization has created an extremely loyal fan base. And the fan base, not the dancing, is the most important aspect to the show- because its the votes that will get you through to the next round. The strongest evidence to this fact? Brandy, arguably one of the best dancers on the show, was sent home last week. Brandy may have been the better dancer, but there was no real reason to love or hate her- so no real reason to become emotionally connected to her and vote for her.

Lesson learned: Extremity and polarization aren’t necessarily bad things. True, you may not please the masses, but the people you do please sure do love you. They’re emotionally connected to you or your brand and become your biggest advocates. (Bristol’s voters)

Bacon Chocolate Chip Cookies!

Bacon Chocolate Chip Cookies!

Yes, you read that correctly. Bacon + Chocolate combines for the perfect little cookie.

My sister first told me about this little bit of culinary heaven (she’s known for her baking, not her decorating) and I knew I had to try it! What’s not to love? Bacon and chocolate are perhaps two of my favorite foods, and I’ve always loved a sweet and salty combo! Don’t be worried about the saltiness of the bacon overwhelming the chocolate– you candy the bacon (read: fancy way to say ‘you put brown sugar on the bacon’) so it’s more of a smoky sweet flavor! Mmm… hungry yet?

And to make these cookies even better, they are just about the easiest things in the world to make! Seriously, just look at how easy!

Living Social: Daily deal for a cable show?

Living Social: Daily deal for a cable show?

Could a cable channel use a Living Social deal (or another group buying platform) to promote tune in for a new show?

Example: Great Migrations on the National Geographic Channel

A quick synopsis:
“National Geographic Channel’s Great Migrations is a seven-part global television event that takes viewers around the world on the arduous journeys millions of animals undertake to ensure the survival of their species. Shot from land and air, in trees and cliff-blinds, on ice floes and underwater, Great Migrations tells the formidable, powerful stories of many of the planet’s species and their movements, while revealing new scientific discoveries with breathtaking high-definition clarity.”
Read more: http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/great-migrations#ixzz15HXuM8rK

I think Tom Shales of the Washington Post recapped the show best:

“‘Stunningly’ beautiful? ‘Rapturously’ beautiful? ‘Shockingly’ beautiful? You can marry a dozen adverbs to ‘beautiful’ and still not capture the compelling grandeur of ‘Great Migrations,’ a wondrous new jaw-dropper… [i]t’s movingly beautiful too, in both senses of ‘moving’ — physical and emotional.”

My first thought- wow, it’s a ‘global’ television event. That’s huge! Think of the millions of potential viewers not only in the US but around the world! And beautiful imagery of animals and the world around us? You’ve got me hooked! But hmmm, the show also sounds a bit familiar… I’m thinking the BBC’s ‘Planet Earth’ and ‘Life’ sound quite similar (and yes, that’s not a typo- the BBC produced the films, not Discovery). Both of these films were beautiful in their own right and are a standout in the natural history film category– but then again, so is Great Migrations. While all 3 films are similar in genre, all 3 do offer something different for viewers. The problem is to then convince the average viewer to tune into Great Migrations when they’re probably thinking, ‘I’ve seen that already… twice.’

I think the answer lies in marketing- adding something different in the marketing plan. Something to shake things up, reach new viewers, and perhaps get a little extra press. What if Great Migrations (or any other major cable special) used the Living Social (or other group buying platform) platform as another advertising avenue?